Dworkin’s Heartbreak, Reviewed

I am reading Dworkin out of order, starting with these personal essays. I have been on an essay and memoir kick recently, and I just can’t pass up a book titled Heartbreak (so good!). A lot of people hate Dworkin, and I suppose this has something to do with her uncompromising stance towards some controversial issues (and saying a bunch of things people don’t want to hear in an impolite way). Some things she wrote were construed as pro-incest, but having read Heartbreak, I am highly skeptical that that was her point. So why does she get a bad rap? People’s disdain and disgust for radical feminists that persists to this day draws me to them so strongly. I’m just starting to piece together the legacy of radical feminism and have a lot of reading and thinking to do, but the stuff gets my heart pumping. And I loved these essays.

Dworkin has a do-or-die commitment to women. She cares deeply for those who have been abused and coerced by men. And she is dedicated to listening to what women have to say.

I do not know why so many women trusted me enough to speak to me, but underneath anything I write one can hear the percussive sound of their heartbeats. If one has to pick one kind of pedagogy over all others, I pick listening.

Through the course of these essays, she shows a tireless impulse to have an open heart towards other people’s pain. She feels the harm that men cause in the world so acutely. This ability to connect one’s experiences to others’, to listen to other women who have basically been through the shit, and then to act on that in a positive way, to set out to make sure that those abuses don’t happen anymore… it’s some of the best things a human can do in the face of this messed up world, and I love Dworkin for it.

The other thing that I am drawn to in her writing (and her life) is her refusal to compromise. In one chapter, she writes about people trying to make her sing “Silent Night,” and how she had never and would never sing it. She calls things as she sees them without mincing words. I mean, I can work to cultivate an appreciation for ambiguity as much as the next person, but there are also situations where a person needs to see through the mud people try to fill your head with. Dworkin sees through this bullshit, she is critical of all the lying adults she encounters, and she resists all the ways that people try to break her spirit.

Advertisements